Middlewich Rd, Rudheath, Northwich CW9 7DT

Physical Education

At RSA all learners strive for excellence through studying a high-quality physical education curriculum that inspires all pupils to succeed and excel in competitive sport and other physically demanding activities. It will provide opportunities for learners to become physically confident in a way which supports their health and fitness. Opportunities to compete in sport and other activities will be provided to build character and help to embed values such as fairness and respect in addition to RSA’s key values of excellence and kindness. The curriculum is sequenced over KS3 and KS4 to develop, apply and consolidate the core and advanced skills and tactics required to prepare learners for competitive sport, an active lifestyle, BTEC Sport and beyond. The fully inclusive PE Curriculum provides opportunities for enrichment to equip all learners with the knowledge and cultural capital to become educated, active and healthy citizens. Barriers are removed to promote engagement and inclusivity. This is done by offering a varied and well differentiated curriculum and by adapting sports and activities when required.

The PE Curriculum reaches out to the local primary schools through the Vale Royal School Sports Partnership’s inclusive competition programme.

Recent data has stated that 39.6% of year 6 students in the Rudheath postcode are overweight with 22.2% being obese. This is amongst the highest in Cheshire West and Chester, second highest in Vale Royal and it is the highest in Northwich. The PE department at RSA must address this and meet the learner’s needs. The mantra and basis for curriculum and extra curriculum planning for PE at The Rudheath Senior Academy will be based on how we can get ‘More students, More Active, More Often!’ The focus is ‘Fitness comes first’ where each pupil is encourages to achieve the ‘personal bests’. We want to see our students arrive to PE with happy faces and leave with red and sweaty faces (and still happy faces!). We must give the cardiovascular and respiratory systems of each and every student a thorough workout each time they come to the PE department. Every student must be encouraged to go for and achieve their own ‘personal best’ irrespective of their ability.

To add to the physical, mental or social benefits of PE and schools sport, the schemes of work will promote scholarship through effective questioning that will support the BTEC Sport course in KS4.

‘Hard work beats talent when talent doesn’t work hard’ – Tim Notke (Basketball coach)

“You can always become better” – Tiger Woods

What are the minimum expectations of the National Curriculum/ Exam Specification?

CORE PE

The national curriculum for physical education aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Develop competence to excel in a broad range of physical activities
  • Are physically active for sustained periods of time
  • Engage in competitive sports and activities
  • Lead healthy, active lives

Pupils at RSA build on and embed the physical development and skills learned in key stages 1 and 2 and become more competent, confident and expert in their techniques, and apply them across different sports and physical activities. Pupils are encouraged to understand what makes a performance effective and how to apply these principles to their own and others’ work, whilst developing confidence and an interest to get involved in exercise, sports and activities out of school and in later life. In order to lead a long and happy life the pupils learn to understand and apply the long-term health benefits of physical activity.

Pupils use a range of tactics and strategies to overcome opponents in direct competition through team and individual games such as badminton, basketball, football, hockey, netball, rounders, rugby and dodgeball. They develop their technique and improve their performance in other competitive sports such as athletics and perform dances using advanced dance techniques within a range of dance styles and forms. RSA pupils also take part in outdoor and adventurous activities such as orienteering which present intellectual and physical challenges. Our pupils are encouraging to work in a team, building on trust and developing skills to solve problems, either individually or as a group.

To complement and add to the above, pupils take part in competitive sports and activities outside school through community sports clubs.

BTEC PE

This course provides an engaging and relevant introduction to the world of sport. It incorporates important aspects of the industry, such as fitness testing and training for sport and exercise, the psychology of sport, practical sports performance and sports leadership. It enables our pupils to develop and apply their knowledge, while also developing a range of relevant practical, communication and technical skills.

RSA students study three mandatory units, covering the underpinning knowledge and skills required for a career in the sports sector. These units are:

  • Fitness for sport and exercise
  • Practical performance in sport
  • Applying the principles of personal training.

An additional unit, leading sports activities allows our pupils to explore leadership roles within sport and gives them the opportunity to plan and deliver a lesson to a cohort of younger pupils. This unit is selected as our pupils excel when faced with leadership opportunities and this has inspired them to pursue career opportunities in the area.

Where/ how do we exceed the minimum expectations for the National Curriculum/ Exam Specification

Developing cultural capital within our school community is a major part of the intent of the PE curriculum. Research states that if a child is exposed to live sport they are more likely to want to play sport and become active. Each year group is taken to a live sports event once a year. In year 7, the pupils watch the world’s best badminton players complete in the UK Open in Birmingham and in year 8, they are given the opportunity to see Andy Murray et al at Wimbledon. This also includes an overnight stay and visit to Wembley stadium to further develop their cultural capital. In year 9, we take the students to live football match. This may be at a premier league club such as Manchester City or at a local club such as Northwich Victoria. The year 10 and 11 BTEC students visit the Athlete Factory in Chester where they work with former England and British Lions rugby player, Phil Greening.

In addition to the above offer, all students across both key stages are invited to go on the RSA ski trip.

We understand that joining a local community club can stimulate a lifelong love of sport and can further develop the pupils sporting skills. Links to local clubs are actively sought and local club providers are invited

in to school to engage with our students. Through research and pupil voice, we have found that if a pupil meets the coach at school they are more likely to attend the club in the evening. This has proved particularly successful with Northwich Rugby Club where a number of our students now play after receiving coaching form a club coach whilst at RSA. Club links develop Interpersonal skills such as leadership, communication and organization.

Curriculum design – How is the curriculum sequenced to help students know more and remember more over time?

CORE PE

KS3 – PE is taught over 4 hours per cycle

KS4 – PE is taught over 4 hours per cycle

We have a clear path of carefully built-up knowledge (theory) and skill acquisition (practical) throughout KS3 and KS4 which enables students to be successful in further education. Year 7 is used for basic core skill acquisition. In year 8 the pupils develop these skills further and more complex and advanced skills are introduced. In year 9 the intention is that students achieve mastery in these skills which can be utilised with different tactics/sequences to compete at a high level and in competition. In KS4 the pupils apply the skills learned in a competitive and inclusive environment. Tier 2 and 3 vocabulary is used at all times support knowledge development in PE and whole school literacy skills. We also have repeated concepts (sticky knowledge) that recur throughout the curriculum in each year of KS3 across a number of physical activities and sports to ensure that students build up knowledge and skills which would provide lifelong exercise adherence or competitive sport. This is assessed via Microsoft Quiz.

The choosing and order of the sports and activities has improving fitness at the core. The weather plays a large part of when an activity is taught. Pupil voice has told us that pupils do not enjoy playing sport on the wet grass when it is cold so to maximise engagement and activity, indoor lessons are planned for the colder months. We also plan the curriculum around local sporting competition. For example RSA play all the football matches from September to October so football is taught in Autumn 1 to give our students a greater skill set in preparation for competition.

Our 5 year progressive curriculum is in place which builds on key skills and tactics in a variety of activities. In addition to preparing learners for competitive situations, improving fitness will be at the core of each lesson and lessons will be active to support this. The sports chosen in line with the national curriculum will encourage activity and the planning will reflect this. In the autumn and spring terms we will deliver Football, Badminton, Ultimate Dodgeball, Netball, Basketball, Handball, Fitness/ Circuits and Athletics. Some groups will be taught Rugby. In the summer term we will focus on Athletics, Rounders’ and Cricket. To prepare learners for BTEC Sport, the questioning will reflect the learning aims in mandatory and optional units. Learners will be given opportunities to develop their leadership skills in KS3 in preparation for BTEC Unit 6 – Leading Sports activities.

What is the national picture/ challenges? How are you overcoming these?

As previously stated – fitness comes first. Recent data has stated that 39.6% of year 6 students in the Rudheath postcode are overweight with 22.2% being obese. The department has a responsibility to monitor and track each student’s cardiovascular endurance, muscular endurance and agility. This is done at 4 different data entry points beginning with the first two lessons in September. This data will be used to highlight and act on any concerns. For example, extra fitness classes have been introduced to those students whose aerobic fitness is a concern. This has proved successful and the data has been used effectively in parent consultation evenings.

How will core PE content be assessed? How is feedback given?

To ensure consistency across all sporting areas all teachers assess the same practical skills in each sport. These skills are tested in isolation, in conditioned practices and in competition. To ensure pupils know and remember more each lesson begins with a knowledge drill and concludes with a plenary/ reflection. In addition to knowledge drills and regular questioning, to assess the pupils’ cognitive understanding of the rules & regulations and skills/ tactics/ tier 3 vocabulary each pupil completes a quiz set via Microsoft Teams. This gives the PE instant data that can be used for future planning and staff CPD. For example, if we notice that a pupil has poor knowledge of the rules of badminton, intervention or further questioning can be put in place. Also, if a whole class scores poorly on the, for example, football skills & tactics quiz, CPD and advice can be given to the class teacher to support them with their pedagogy.

In addition to assessing each pupil’s practical skills, the RSA PE department assess each pupil’s aerobic endurance (bleep test), core muscular endurance (one minute sit up test) and agility (Illinois agility run). This is done at 4 different data entry points beginning with the first two lessons in September. This data is used to highlight, and act on, any concerns. Feedback is given verbally and by using normative comparison tables. Extra fitness classes have been introduced to those students whose aerobic fitness is a concern. This data been used to motivate pupils and has been used effectively in parent consultation evenings.

We also have repeated concepts (sticky knowledge) that recur throughout the curriculum in each year of KS3 across a number of physical activities and sports to ensure that students build up knowledge and skills which would provide lifelong exercise adherence of competitive sport. This is assessed via Microsoft Quiz in the same way as the sporting activities.

In addition to assessment via MS Teams, the pupils are regularly assessed through verbal questioning at the beginning, during and end of each lesson with verbal feedback given instantly. For example, in the changing rooms, knowledge drills are used to develop understanding of previous learning.

To monitor how well different groups are progressing/ attaining a whole school core PE tracker can be accessed by all PE staff via MS teams. This is a working document so all teachers can add the pupils grades, fitness scores and athletics times on one central document. This allows the HoD to monitor each class and to intervene in order to close gaps in learning if necessary. The data can also be used in ‘virtual’ fitness competitions or sports days and provide pupils intervention or staff CPD when necessary.

Feedback and encouragement is delivered verbally in each PE lesson. This allows the pupils to apply it instantly in practice and is used to motivate and engage. The data tracker is also used to provide feedback as it is qualitative data that can form the basis for important 121 conversations that can be held on and off the sports field and at parent consultation evening.

BTEC SPORT

YEAR 1 – 5 hours across 2 weeks

UNIT 6 – Leading Sports Activities

UNIT 2 – Practical Performance in Sport

YEAR 2 – 5 hours across 2 weeks

UNIT 1 – Fitness for Sport and Exercise (EXAM)

UNIT 3 – Applying the Principles of Personal Training

The order that of the BTEC Sport units is carefully thought out to give our pupils the best chance of success. They are taught in the order shown above. Unit 6- Leading Sports Activities allows the pupils to learn how to teach and coach. Their assessment will be through written assignments and a video recording of them delivering a sporting session. This unit is delivered first because our students enjoy this unit and the self-confidence and enthusiasm that the pupils gain from this unit inspires them to do well in the future units.

Unit 2- Practical Performance in Sport, asks for the pupils to research two sports of their choice, and assess their own performance in both these sports. Assessment is through written assignments and video recordings of each candidate performing in both of their chosen sports. This unit is delivered in the warmer months to allow our pupils a better opportunity to play and video record their chosen sports under better environmental conditions.

We begin year 11 by teaching the content for the exam unit- UNIT 1 – Fitness for Sport and Exercise. There is a holistic exam approach in year 11 across all subjects and we have found that our students achieve better outcomes if this unit is taught at the start of year 11. The first exam is sat in January. However, each pupil has two chances to sit the exam so if required they can re-sit the exam in May or June following intensive revision and intervention upon completion of their coursework.

Unit 3 completes the course as it allows each pupil to apply what they have learned in the previous units by developing their own personal fitness programme. The pupils identify a training aim, perhaps one they identified in units 1 or 2, and develop and implement a plan to meet this aim. On completion of the training programme, the pupils review and evaluate its effectiveness. We also explore possible career and further education pathways that could be taken in year 12 and beyond with visits from local education providers a big part of this.

How will BTEC SPORT content be assessed? How is feedback given?

Each Unit (see above) has three learning aims. Each assignment is tailored to meet the needs of each learning aim. The pupils are taught the content and then given time to complete each assessment task. These tasks are completed, marked and feedback given in line with the BTEC Sport assessment plan and BTEC procedures- EG- students’ marks are internally verified.

To ensure pupils know and remember more, regular low stakes testing and mini quizzes are used along with knowledge drills. Every lesson begins with a knowledge drill which assesses prior learning and all lessons have scaffolded Q&A embedded. These assessment opportunities allow feedback to be given verbally or non-verbally through class book comments or by using the chat function on MS Teams.

To monitor how well different groups are progressing/ attaining a whole school BTEC PE tracker can be accessed by all PE staff via MS teams. This is a working document so all teachers can add the pupils grades for each learning aim on to one central document. This allows the HoD to monitor each class and the data can be used to provide pupil intervention or staff CPD when necessary. For example if assessment data shows a particular class is doing poorly in a learning aim, targeted intervention can be implemented to close the gap before a re-submission is entered.

Feedback and encouragement is delivered verbally in each PE lesson. This allows the pupils to apply it instantly in practice and is used to motivate and engage. The data tracker is also used to provide feedback as it is qualitative data that can form the basis for important 121 conversations that can be held on and off the sports field and at parent consultation evening.

What pedagogical approaches are used to ensure high quality learning takes place?

In September, the pupils will complete baseline fitness tests to test their cardiovascular endurance, muscular endurance and agility. Progress will be monitored at the end of LP2, LP4 and LP6.

Students will be taught different sporting activities and assessed against the given criteria. Practical assessments will allow students to show their learnt core and advanced skills in isolation, in conditioned practices and in competition. These practical assessments will take place at the end of LP2, LP4 and LP6.

To ensure pupils know and remember more and to assess the pupils’ cognitive understanding of the rules & regulations and skills/ tactics/ tier 3 vocabulary each pupil completes a quiz set via Microsoft Teams. This gives the PE instant data that can be used for future planning and staff CPD. For example if we notice that a pupil has poor knowledge of the rules of badminton, intervention or further questioning can be put in place. Also, if a whole class scores poorly on the, for example, football skills & tactics quiz, CPD and advice can be given to the class teacher to support them with their pedagogy.

Further learning strategies that are used to build cognitive load, long term understanding as well as resilience in core PE and BTEC Sport include;

  • Tailoring individual fitness plans that allow students to flourish physically and mentally.
  • Questioning will be used to develop ownership of an individual’s fitness.
  • Inspirational talks (group and 121) by successful athletes or professionals within sport that will motivate each student to work harder- EG- Sports presentation evening.
  • The benefits of an active and healthy lifestyle will be modelled.
  • Modelling (and evaluation) is used to develop understanding of difficult concepts.
  • Practical and competitive skills demonstrated and discussed to develop tactics and strategies.
  • Long term memory is built over time through retrieval of information from short and long term memory: This can be done through questioning and inter- sport analysis.
  • Knowledge drills at the beginning of each lesson
  • Q&A plenaries
  • Metacognition and self-regulation tools to help learners direct their own learning and cognitive development.
  • To prepare learners for BTEC Sport, exam questions and criteria based questioning will be introduced and developed.
  • Interim assessments take many forms, are varied in style to meet a variety of disciplines and are appropriate to the topic being taught.
  • Each half term, learners receive oral feedback about their knowledge and understanding as well as their physical progression.
  • Each BTEC Sport Unit (see above) has three learning Aims. Each assignment is tailored to meet the needs of each learning aim. The students are taught the content and then given time to complete each assessment task. These tasks are completed and marked in line with the BTEC Sport assessment plan.
  • BTEC moderators report, BTEC standardised materials and the Pearson assessment materials are used to inform and improve planning and delivery.

What opportunities are offered to enrich the cultural capital of ALL learners?

Enrichment opportunities are embedded into the curriculum, offering ALL learners a broader experience of PE within and outside of the academy. Sporting fixtures against other schools allow learners to apply the skills learned and evaluate their own performances against their peers, preparing them for future progression. ALL learners have the opportunity to play competitive sport. No one is excluded. One of the benefits of being a small school is that ALL pupils who express an interest in playing, for example, the school football team will get the opportunity to play. We also enter competitions that specifically target SEND pupils. For example, we were the Vale Royal PAN Boccia champions in 2019. Every student is encouraged to ‘ achieve their personal best’ irrespective of their ability, SEND need or economic background.

To ensure progress for all learners, lessons are differentiated to allow all learners a chance to excel and achieve. Differentiation may include allowing a less confident pupils to play their badminton against pupils of similar ability or it may include adaptation of the equipment used. For example, the purchase of larger rounders’ bats has a massive impact on the engagement of the less able pupils and led to maximum participation and enjoyment for all. We also stretch and challenge the more able by providing them with a more competitive platform for them to complete. For example, in a basketball lesson the more able will compete against each other in conditioned practices (EG – 2v2) and match play.

We understand that introducing leadership opportunities can have a massive impact on self-confidence for all students- especially those who may not share an obvious passion for sport. In addition to leadership opportunities within lessons, learners will have the opportunity to lead and officiate at RSA cluster primary sporting events and shown a progress pathway should officiating be a chosen career. At RSA, we aim for all learners to be given these opportunities.

Developing cultural capital within our school community is a major part of how greater depth is achieved within the PE curriculum. Research states that if a child is exposed to live sport they are more likely to want to play sport and become active. Each year group is given the opportunity to attend a live sports event once a year. In year 7, the pupils watch the world’s best badminton players complete in the UK Open in Birmingham and in year 8, they are given the opportunity to see Andy Murray et al at Wimbledon. This also includes an overnight stay and visit to Wembley stadium to further develop their cultural capital. In year 9, we take the students to live football match. This may be at a premier league club such as Manchester City or at a local club such as Northwich Victoria. The year 10 and 11 BTEC students visit the Athlete Factory in Chester where they work with former England and British Lions rugby player, Phil Greening. To expose our students to local clubs and providers we aim to invite expert coaches from local sports clubs to work with our pupils.

In addition to the above offer, all students across both key stages are invited to go on the RSA ski trip.

To celebrate the success of the PE department, we host an annual sports presentation evening where pupils are awarded medals under the sporting values of Teamwork, Determination, Excellence, Passion and Leadership. We invite guest speakers to share their story and distribute the medals. Past guest speakers include Sue Smith, Tom Heaton, Jenna Downing and Natasha Jonas.

High standards in PE education are monitored through half termly curriculum reviews, which consult with progress data to develop intervention strategies and are triangulated against lesson observations, work scrutiny, staff and learner voice. Our pupil’s are listened too and actions are taken. For example, our students told us they wanted goalposts on the school field so they could play more football. We now have 4 ‘Samba’ goalposts that are used during every break, lunchtime and after school football session. KS4 students expressed a desire to play table tennis ‘socially’ at lunchtimes. This resulted in the purchase of 4 table tennis tables.

How are you teaching literacy through your subject?

Tier 2 and 3 vocabulary has been built in to each PE / BTEC sport scheme of work and a Tier 2/3 matrix is currently under construction. We understand that we must complicity use the appropriate sporting terminology and language if we want pupils to engage in, and have a lifelong love of, sport and exercise. In core PE and BTEC sport, oracy opportunities for pupils include knowledge drills and peer assessment as well as discussions about strategies and tactics.

To ensure pupils know and remember more and to assess the pupils’ cognitive understanding of the rules & regulations and skills/ tactics as well as their tier 2/3 vocabulary, each pupil completes a quiz set via Microsoft Teams that asks them for example, what the ‘Fosbury flop’ is or what ‘Aerobic endurance’ is. This gives the PE team instant data that can be used for apply intervention. For example if we notice that a pupil has poor knowledge of the tier 2/3 vocabulary in fitness or badminton we can add intervention to support them.

Further strategies include:

  • Following the RSA literacy policy
  • The effective use of sporting text delivered via MS Teams or on each notice board
  • Development of a Tier 2/3 matrix
  • Discussing current sports matches and tournaments
  • Well planned and differentiated BTEC Sport lessons that follow the RSA literacy policy
  • Use of GL assessment data to develop cognitive load and discussion points.

Homework

CORE PE – KS3/KS4

RSA has an extensive extra-curricular programme that can be accessed by all students. No one is excluded. The programme changes each term and reflects the pupil voice, upcoming sporting fixtures and environmental conditions.

To reinforce the intent of the PE department, students will be encouraged to perform at least 2 forms of sustained exercise per week. This can be any form of exercise such as walking, running, cycling or swimming and should aim to last at least 20 minutes. There will also be weekly subject specific videos/ fitness challenges posted on Microsoft Teams and the pupils are expected to watch these mini- video tutorials ahead of each week’s lessons.

To encourage cultural capital, pupils are asked to watch live sports events with their families either on TV or in person.

BTEC SPORT

Students will receive 1 piece of homework per week that will focus on checking knowledge based upon the key BTEC Sport learning aims. This will prepare students for internal or external (exam) assessment and will be set in class and via Microsoft Teams.

How do you ensure the transition to KS4 is successful is a progressive model over 5 years?

Our 5 year progressive curriculum is in place which builds on key skills and tactics in a variety of activities. In addition to preparing learners for competitive situations, improving fitness will be at the core of each lesson and lessons will be active to support this. The sports chosen in line with the national curriculum will encourage activity and the planning will reflect this. In the autumn and spring terms we will deliver Football, Badminton, Ultimate Dodgeball, Netball, Basketball, Handball, Fitness/ Circuits and Athletics. Some groups will be taught Rugby. In the summer term we will focus on Athletics, Rounders’ and Cricket. To prepare learners for BTEC Sport, the questioning will reflect the learning aims in mandatory and optional units. Learners will be given opportunities to develop their leadership skills in KS3 in preparation for BTEC Unit 6 – Leading Sports activities. Pupils will also be asked to choose to focus on two sports for the practical sport unit. Pupils can choose any of the sports explored in KS3 or a sport they complete in outside of school.

The uptake for BTEC Sport is currently 20%. To promote this further we can allow our year 9 students to see possible career opportunities with the sports industry and to meet and talk to personal within the industry. For example a personal trainer or a leisure center manager.

How does your curriculum celebrate diversity including gender and BAME representation?

Rudheath Senior Academy holistically ensures that every curriculum area and every lesson celebrate diversity and that all genders and BAME are represented. Within PE all staff use examples that adhere to this policy. For example, when teaching football, we refer to and use linked videos that include athletes of different cultures, colour and gender.

What is the subject offer for blended learning?

CORE PE

Pupils will maintain activity at home and follow the PE department’s intent by completing a variety of fitness challenges and ‘30 minute fitness’ activities which will be shared via Microsoft Teams. Pupils can also access visual knowledge organisers (mini videos) in addition to the ‘normal’ knowledge organisers that explain and show the key skills, concepts and rules for each sport and activity in the curriculum. Pupils can then practice these skills in their own safe space knowing that they are not missing any key information.

BTEC PE

Students will continue their learning through well planned synchronous/ asynchronous lessons and tasks will be set via Microsoft Teams. In addition to this, mini- visual tutorials will be issued when necessary.

How do you ensure staff development in your curriculum area?

All PE staff and the wider school staff are expected to make a positive contribution to departmental developments and to stay well read about current pedagogies and practices to support excellence in teaching and learning with and maintain a strong sense of scholarship. Staff development is supported PDT, leadership programmes and sport specific training programmes.

To highlight gaps in staff knowledge, the department holds a CPD audit to discover staff knowledge across all the sports and activities. Specific CPD is then sought and delivered. For example, if a staff member, PE specialist or non-PE specialist, would like extra CPD on a particular sport or activity, then appropriate CPD will either be delivered on site by the HoD through peer coaching or it will be externally sourced.

The PE team regularly meet, formally and informally, to discuss fresh pedagogy and to share good practice. We also meet during morning briefings. We are also members of the ‘ShareLearnTeach’ and ‘TES resources’ families and this has generated many ideas and lesson plans that have been implemented.

The impact of a well-structured and varied PE curriculum taught by enthusiastic and well trained professionals will be a culture where sport and fitness is seen as a priority by every pupil irrespective of their ability. Pupils will strive to be their ‘personal best’ in each lesson and want to improve their fitness scores and core PE grades at each data entry point. The happy and self-confident pupils will enjoy and look forward to PE lessons and understand the mental and social benefits of PE in addition to the physical benefits. These benefits will be seen across the whole school curriculum.

The above will lead to a greater uptake to BTEC Sport at KS4 where the pupils will achieve a positive P8 score and look to develop their sporting knowledge through further education or via a career in the sport and exercise sector.

Whilst at RSA we want each and every child to have the opportunity to;

  • Experience up to three live sports event in KS3.
  • Play competitive sport against their class mates and peers from another school.
  • Enjoy the physical, social and mental benefits of regular extra-curricular sport.
  • Be equipped with the fitness needed for their next stage in life.
  • Listen to inspirational talks by PE and sports professionals.
  • Learn from external coaches from local sports clubs.
  • Attend an RSA Sports Presentation Evening and receive a medal.
  • Understand more about further education and career opportunities in sport and fitness.
  • Play a variety of sports and activities within curriculum time in a fun, yet purposeful environment.
  • Develop their aerobic fitness and buck the trend of increasing obesity in the Rudheath postcode.
  • Choose BTEC Sport and achieve the best grade they can and contribute to a positive P8 score.

Holistically, we feel, for the reasons explained above, that the PE department can contribute massively to whole school success academically and emotionally.

Quality assurance

To ensure that all students are provided with a challenging yet fun PE curriculum that meets the local demands alongside the intent, the PE department will analyse the information and data from the PE core tracker and BTEC sport tracker to monitor pupil progress and intervention. In core PE there will be a particular focus on the fitness data and we want to see improvements for example, in each pupils bleep test score. We will know if our intent is being achieved because we will have maximum participation in lessons, extra-curricular clubs / interventions will be attended and aerobic endurance levels will have improved.

Pupil voice opportunities and parent consultation evenings will allow us to further check the appropriateness of the curriculum and the motivation/ engagement of our pupils. Informal and formal conversations and teacher observation will provide further evidence. We want to see our students arrive to PE with happy faces and leave with red and sweaty faces (and still happy faces!).

In addition to this we will;

  • Review the curriculum during half termly PE department meetings
  • Triangulate evidence from the teacher, pupils and tracker
  • Conduct departmental learning walks and lesson observations
  • Liaise with local PE specialists/ Head of department to monitor local developments and trends
  • Administer audits to check resources, NC developments and staff CPD requirements
  • Internally verify each BTEC Sport assessment timetable
  • Internally verify each BTEC Sport assignment brief
  • Internally verify all student BTEC Sport work
  • BTEC Sport book review
  • Amend the faculty improvement plan (FIP) to reflect student needs.