Middlewich Rd, Rudheath, Northwich CW9 7DT

Art & Design

A key priority for Art and Design is to open pupils eyes to the world of possibilities around them, by offering a fully inclusive curriculum providing cultural capital opportunities for enrichment and inspiration, to equip learners with the knowledge and skills to become well rounded and educated citizens who have the potential to access A-level and beyond. Topics are specifically designed to enthuse and are inclusive of needs, ability and interest.

What are the minimum expectations of the National Curriculum/ Exam Specification?

The KS3 National Curriculum for Art states that; “Mastery of Art & Design is achieved through a detailed, inclusive and varied creative curriculum”. This is further broken into:

  • produce creative work, exploring their ideas and recording their experiences
  • become proficient in drawing, painting, sculpture and other art, craft and design techniques
  • evaluate and analyse creative works using the language of art, craft and design
  • know about great artists, craft makers and designers, and understand the historical and cultural development of their art forms.

Subject Content

KS3

Pupils should be taught to develop their creativity and ideas, and increase proficiency in their execution. They should develop a critical understanding of artists, architects and designers, expressing reasoned judgements that can inform their own work. Pupils should be taught:

  • to use a range of techniques to record their observations in sketchbooks, journals and other media as a basis for exploring their ideas
  • to use a range of techniques and media, including painting
  • to increase their proficiency in the handling of different materials
  • to analyse and evaluate their own work, and that of others, in order to strengthen the visual impact or applications of their work about the history of art, craft, design and architecture, including periods, styles and major movements from ancient times up to the present day.

GCSE Content

At GCSE for Art and Design: Fine Art and Art and Design: 3D Design, Pupils must study the following components:

  • Component 1 (portfolio) Pupils develop responses to initial starting points, project briefs or specified tasks and realise intentions informed by research, the development and refinement ofideas and meaningful engagement with selected sources. Responses will include evidence of drawing for different purposes and needs and written annotation.
  • In Component 2 (externally set assignment) Pupils respond to a starting point provided by AQA. This response provides evidence of the student’s ability to work independently within specified time constraints, realise intentions that are personal and meaningful and explicitly address the requirements of all four assessment objectives.

Where/ how do we exceed the minimum expectations for the National Curriculum/ Exam Specification?

The national curriculum requirements stated above are solely used as a basic checklist. The curriculum delivered through the Art Department exceeds this expectation in the following ways:

  • Pupils are offered a wide range of media to use within their study; graphite, Charcoal, ink, acrylic and watercolour painting, spray paint, collage, photography, printmaking and 3D mediums in the form of clay sculpture, wire forming and mixed media approaches.
  • Pupils are supported as individuals and projects are set to suit needs, interest and ability.
  • Pupils in KS3 are given half term long projects that offer the opportunity for Pupils to input their own ideas and is more inclusive of their interests.
  • Pupils are given time, freedom and independence to develop their own artist style.
  • Pupils learn to assess their own work through self/peer and teacher assessment and feedback.
  • Pupils are given the opportunity to analyse artists in order to feed into their own work.
  • Greater depth with the curriculum prepares Pupils for GCSE by developing their creativity whilst exploring a diverse and culturally rich curriculum. High quality planning that ensures a diverse enriched curriculum that widens their horizon to culture outside of local area. Pupils learn through different styles, genres and cultures.
  • The art department runs Period 6/7 for GCSE Pupils where they can further develop their art work and explore new media not yet partaken in.
  • Teacher demonstrations using resources such as a visualiser to model key skills.
  • Adapting the Year 8 and 9 curriculum to make it relevant for pupils and the community they live in e.g Exploring street art (Graffiti) by inviting an artist in to work with pupils on large scale art work around school and changing the mindset of Graffiti to it being art work and something to be celebrated rather than a negative connotations in the community.
  • Building relationships with the local feeder primary and NWAT schools e.g Opportunity for Year 6 to work with GCSE groups to improve their own Leadership and communication skills alongside promoting Art.
  • Exhibiting pupil’s work in a high traffic area space in school creating an Art Gallery to show off pupil’s work.

How is the curriculum sequenced to help pupils know more and remember more over time?

We have a clear path of carefully built up knowledge and skills throughout KS3 and KS4 which enables pupils to be successful at GCSE and beyond. The sequenced art curriculum ensures Pupils start with using accessible media, learn engaging techniques that start at beginner level moving to more complex mediums and concepts. At key stage 3, Pupils work in half termly projects. The projects replicate that of a concise GCSE project. Pupils study artists – analyse concepts and replicate work, they develop their own ideas showing influence of artists studied. Within each project Pupils explore a range media, produce written

reflections of their journey and have their work assessed through peer/self and teacher feedback forward methods. This project order and method of working is repeated in every project, giving the Pupils the grounding and continuity to refine and revisit each component of project requirements.

Curriculum design The KS3 curriculum is structured with 1 hour lesson per week incorporating;

Pupils have their own sketchbook and throughout the year they complete 4 projects being assessed each half term on a level of skill based on A01, A02, A03, A04 strands of assessment and learning. This allows sequences skills and knowledge that prepare pupils for accessing the GCSE course.

  • AO1: Develop ideas through investigations, demonstrating critical understanding of sources.
  • AO2: Refine work by exploring ideas, selecting and experimenting with appropriate media, materials, techniques and processes.
  • AO3: Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions as work progresses.
  • AO4: Present a personal and meaningful response that realises intentions and demonstrates understanding of visual language.

The KS4 curriculum is structured with 5 hour lessons per fortnight incorporating;

  • 4 projects over Year 10 and Year 11. (Assessed half termly) Curriculum teaches skills based on A01, A02, A03, A04 strands of assessment and learning.

Each project starts with a baseline assessment in order to assess pupils prior skills. They are also assessed at the end of each assessment to see pupil progression. This is followed by an introduction to the theme and assessment objectives (A01, A02, A03 and A04). Lessons begin with a discussion of prior knowledge and previous lesson recaps and homework is set to enhance Pupils understanding of key skills and artists. Lesson reflections are completed to ensure pupils can evaluate their work and know how to improve it for a follow up lesson.

How is the course structured in KS4?

The course is made up of two units of work.

Component 1: Portfolio (60%)

  • Pupils must produce sustained projects evidencing the journey from initial engagement to the realisation of intentions and a selection of further experimental work.

Component 2: Externally set assignment (40%)

  • Question papers containing a selection of starting points are set by the examination board and issued to candidates in January.
  • Pupils are given a preliminary period of time to research and plan for the production of either a single response to their chosen starting point, or a series of responses, during a 10 hour supervised examination.

To support deeper learning within our curriculum, we employ the use of metacognitive strategies. These are explicitly taught in conjunction with subject specific content to ensure pupils can successfully apply these to their own learning.  

Pupils become increasingly independent from Years 7 – 11, building confidence in practical skills and greater depth of understanding in each topic.

This involves a series of steps within each lesson that begins with activating prior knowledge and leading to independent practice before ending in structured reflection. These are based on Barak Rosenshine’s Principles of instruction:

  • Teacher starts each lesson with a knowledge drill (review of relevant prior knowledge to activate schemata ready to build new knowledge into long term learning) 
  • Learning question 
  • Small amounts of new knowledge are presented at a time with the opportunity for students to then practice this new material 
  • Regular, extensive questioning of all students 
  • Model answers and worked examples are regularly provided where appropriate 
  • Give students opportunities for extensive, successful, independent practice  
  • Use formative/summative assessment and feedback-next steps to secure students’ progress 
  • Reflection of learning question
  • Follow Behaviour for Learning protocols 
  • Use of knowledge organisers

How is work assessed?

Both units are marked internally and moderated by the examination board.

Assessment is based on four Assessment Objectives, which are designed to measure Pupils’ progress in terms of their development of knowledge and understanding. All four are equally weighted and are as follows:

  • Develop ideas through investigations, demonstrating critical understanding of sources
  • Refine work by exploring ideas, selecting and experimenting with appropriate media, materials, techniques and processes
  • Record ideas, observations and insights relevant as work progresses
  • Present a personal and meaningful response piece that realises intentions and demonstrates understanding of visual language.

Summative assessments occur three times throughout the year which involves a two week period of revisiting previous skills in order to create a final piece of work.

In the current situation, it is evident that our pupils have struggled going through two lockdowns away from their routines and socialising. Art and Design is such an important subject that allows pupils to channel their emotions and thoughts into their art work.

  • Knowledge drills are used at the start of lessons. This is in the form of questions based on prior knowledge with whole class marking producing instant responses marked in green pen. Self-marking of knowledge drills allows instant feedback and often leads to discussion. Knowledge drills are also used to collaborate information such as key vocabulary and definitions.
  • Where possible modelling is used to demonstrate skills and presentation. This is mainly teacher led but pupils are also identified to lead on demonstrating or showing skills such as presentation.
  • Using a visualiser to demonstrate both practical and theory has become a integral part of implementation. For example, being able to demonstrate accurate shading techniques. Teaching online has also benefited from the use of a visualizer as detailed images can be seen on a large screen which can open discussion.
  • Pupils are encouraged to look beyond their normal and look at being diverse. Part of implementing practical work is to research other nationalities and look at culture and historical influences on art.
  • All year groups are encouraged to take part in practical lessons where skills are the main focus. This enables development of skills through KS3 and KS4. Skills in KS4 are enhanced and further developed.
  • Reference to Colour theory and The Elements of art are begun and then developed through Year 7 to Year 11 along with all key skills.

How are you teaching literacy through your subject?

Oracy

All pupils follow the literacy policy that is attached to books, this is generic throughout the school. SMID data provides all the information needed to track and find information when planning lessons.

Pupils are encouraged to discuss and share ideas and outcomes. The lessons run on a non-hands up policy where all pupils are expected to answer a question or give feedback. Questions are levelled at ability but used to stretch thinking. Pupils are not set up to always get the correct answer. This encourages pupils to think and readdress a response.

Techniques used include;

  • WWW and EBI verbal feedback
  • Verbal peer discussions
  • Key word homework Year 7 Art Quiz
  • Questioning
  • Reading out loud

Reading

KS3 and KS4 are required to read instructions. Time is allocated at the start of a practical lesson for instructions to be read and questions asked. Pupils are also encouraged to annotate information and as a stretch activity some pupils will be asked to identify equipment used in the practical.

  • Quotes
  • Facts
  • Tier 2 and Tier 3 words built into end of project homework
  • Artist research/ Reading for each topic

Writing

KS3 will evaluate verbally and in a written format. Theory books show evidence of written work. KS4 show in their books clear notes taken in lessons. These need to be concise as they will be used as a reference for revision. There are several pupils who use a laptop for taking notes and they use Teams as an online class notebook.

Vocabulary is a strong focus and is used consistently in discussions and written work. This embeds knowledge and secures the use of food preparation and nutrition language used in exam papers.

  • Artists page/ writing facts, opinions and quotes about artist
  • SOW Tier 2/3 words appear in knowledge drills
  • Key words evaluating at the end of each lesson. WWW and EBI written reflection

KS3 will evaluate verbally and in a written format. Sketchbooks show evidence of written work. KS4 show in their books clear notes taken in lessons/annotation and evaluation. These need to be concise as they will be used as part of assessment towards GCSE grade and they use Teams as an online class notebook.

Vocabulary is a strong focus and is used consistently in discussions and written work. This embeds knowledge and secures the use of art vocabulary and annotation in sketchbooks.

The use of GL assessment data especially in spelling and comprehension data allows us to identify pupils. There is also effective use of text and reading with lessons ad projects. For example, the use of test is used in artist research allowing pupils to gain history and context as to why they are studying and learning certain skills.

Assessment and feedback

How do you ensure the needs of ALL learners are met?

  • Pupils complete the same work with elements of support and challenge. The curriculum is starts with the basics and it is sequenced in a way that everyone can learn as we go but be stretched.
  • Seating plans and extra support ensure that disadvantages Pupils including PP, SEN and EAL get the support that they need.
  • Routines for learning and consistency- whole school non-negotiables used in each lesson.

What approaches are in place to close the gap?

  • Formative – Higher level Questioning, Knowledge Drills
  • Summative – End of unit assessments
  • Using trackers to identify pupils with lowest P8 to invite to extra-curricular and to provide extra intervention for

How do teachers adapt the curriculum in response to individual SEND Pupils’ needs?

  • Modelling, talking through the questions, extra support and questioning, Coloured paper for extra needs. Scaffolding, use of data, EHCP, SENCAR/ strategies and Seating plans.

How does the curriculum STRETCH and CHALLENGE all learners, including the higher ability?

  • Learners are stretched and challenged by teaching to the top and showing them high quality example through teacher demonstration and celebration of pupil’s work. As pupils work they are then offered individual feedback.
  • Pupils are then guided to use their own imagination and creativity to create their own art work within a style.
  • Verbal feedback will be given during all lessons to encourage progress – where possible this will be in the form of questions to encourage pupil ownership of learning and progress.
  • Verbal feedback will also use the format of ‘What Went Well’ and ‘Even Better If’ – to deliver praise and the expectation of improvement.
  • Pupil books are used to consolidate learning and provide written feedback. Feedback will be provided at regular intervals on the completion of classwork, summative and formative assessment. Pupils will also self-assess their own progress at intervals.
  • Teacher marking will be in purple pen and feedback by pupils will be in green pen.
  • Knowledge drills will be used as starters and throughout lesson time to recap on knowledge during lessons and from past learning.

Homework

Homework is set at the end of a project (Half termly). Part of home learning will be to identify and use key vocabulary artist information learnt to create a factual sheet/ comprehension of understanding. This will combine key vocabulary (tier 2 and 3 words) and built in comprehension skills learnt to stretch knowledge and understanding of art vocabulary and allow for higher level of learning to take place independently.

What opportunities are offered to enrich the cultural capital of ALL learners?

Enrichment opportunities are embedded into the curriculum, offering learners a broader experience of Art & Design. There are secure links with local schools, partnership schools and the wider community. It is important for learners to experience art competitions, art galleries and working with external artists in order to widen their knowledge and skills.

How do you ensure the transition to KS4 is successful is a progressive model over 5 years?

Art & Design is a popular GCSE with a differentiated cohort. From year 7 we allow Pupils to be independent, but have the ability to support pupils who need that little extra in gaining more confidence. We promote independence and encourage individuals to develop and adapt practical work. Even if this involves mistakes.

Throughout KS3 we develop and extend learning. For example, in Year 7 we look at the Colour Theory and the Elements of Art and pupils are introduced to artists research and transcriptions, designing and producing final outcomes. Pupils then extend this knowledge in Year 8 with more detailed knowledge of shading, blending, tone, form and proportions and building upon skills learnt about research and annotation/evaluation. Year 9 looks in more detail at drawing, scaling techniques and 3D, painting skills. This blends into the GSCE curriculum where all the knowledge gained is used to understand the different art techniques and mediums, their understanding of artists and annotation/evaluation.

Gatsby Benchmarks

7 – All Year 10 and 11 have the opportunity to visit higher education colleges and we have the opportunity to take part in a competition run by one Warrington Vale Royal college. This allows pupils to experience college life and how an industrial kitchen would be run.

What is the subject offer for blended learning?

The use of the visualizer has allowed so many opportunities for blended learning to take place. During lockdown the visualizer was an invaluable piece of equipment and allowed the art skills and techniques to be demonstrated to Pupils’ houses. Close up demonstrations allow understanding and knowledge to develop as Pupils can practice at home alongside the visualizer. Screen sharing allowed feedback from the teacher instantly and outcomes were shared on Teams or in class notebook. KS4 watched demonstrations on key art skills and were able to see close up detailed examples.

This way of teaching has continued in the classroom and opportunities are still being explored. The use of an iPad is a new concept and this will be a strong focus for the new academic year ahead.

As a department we are passionate about improving the Art capital of our young people so they are equipped with the knowledge and skills for the next stage of their journey.

We are currently developing an enrichment programme in Art that not only continues our work with STEAM/Creative Art’s ambassadors but also provides a variety of experiences which enrich cultural awareness. We are also hoping to offer meaningful Art related trips for each year group especially /Art related experience days with leaders in their field coming to share their jobs and experiences with our pupils and external visitors/artists coming to add extra excitement and experience to our subject.

How do you ensure staff development in your curriculum area?

All staff at RSA are expected to make a positive contribution to whole school and department learning and developments. They are expected to keep up to date with current pedagogies and practises to support excellence in both teaching and learning with and maintain a strong sense of scholarship. Staff development and ambition is supported through leadership programmes, staff training and CPD opportunities for both practise and assessment within the Art’s. There are also close links with other schools in the local area. These links are used to help moderate work as well as discussing any changes and sharing ideas. CPD looks at literacy and numeracy as a whole school focus which encourages mapping to be revisited to make changes and adapt to new ideas.

The Impact of the Art & Design curriculum is measured through data produced at each key assessment stage and through external assessments. The quality of work produced is of a consistently high standard and quality and in the top quintile for all schools. All learners are equipped with the knowledge and skills for their next stage in education and are informed of prospective art careers that could be ventured upon later in life.

Quality assurance

How will you know your intent is being achieved?

  • Regular meetings with HOF and the Science department team allows for feedback and time to reflect on the intent. Questions can be asked and answered and new strategies can be implemented to maintain the outcomes set out.
  • Quality assurance will be seen in learning walks, book scrutiny and discussions with pupils about their personal aims and targets.
  • Periodically include student voice through discussion with a range of selected pupils to ensure that their feedback and any concerns are taken into account when developing the curriculum and programme of Art related experiences.

Lesson strategies to build resilience and leadership

  • Baseline assessments and learning programme introduction
  • Knowledge Drills at the beginning of each lesson
  • Key vocab taught, explained and recapped in self/peer assessment – WWW/ EBI at end of each lesson
  • Continual recapping and building upon prior knowledge and skills
    (Questioning- open and closed)
  • Modelling (and evaluation) is used to develop artistic reasoning skills
  • Practical skills to develop artistic skill
  • Long term memory is built over time through retrieval of information from short term and long-term memory; repetition, mind mapping, sequencing of skills and artist knowledge, artist research pages, artist analysis and peer and independent learning strategies
  • Reflection time, peer and individual and time to address errors or/and alterations. Reflection of learning is written in KS4 each lesson to evaluate progress and performance
  • Self-regulation techniques to aid Pupils to take ownership of their own learning

What pedagogical approaches are used to ensure high quality learning takes place?

Pupils can express themselves using a range of different materials when looking at a variety of different themes and artists. The art curriculum provides opportunities to work with two-dimensional media, such as drawing, painting, mixed media and printmaking. Pupils will also have the opportunity to work with 3D materials and create a range of sculptures. The curriculum is personalised to meet individual skills and interests and allows all Pupils to achieve their potential.

Drawing plays a fundamental part in the development of all art work in the curriculum, however, Pupils will also experience a variety of different artistic activities such as painting, ceramics, printmaking, three-dimensional work, collage, mixed media, textiles, photography, ICT and sketchbook work.

The art curriculum involves Pupils exploring the applications of both new technologies and historical and contemporary art practice within their work. All Pupils are encouraged to develop their knowledge and understanding of how to:

  • develop ideas through looking at artists’ work
  • explore art media, materials and processes to express and create original ideas
  • record their experiences and observations using a variety of methods
  • acquire a command of specialist artistic vocabulary and an insight into the value and significance of art in society

Each unit starts with a baseline assessment in order to allow Pupils to showcase skills previously learnt. Then there is an introduction to the theme and assessment objectives (A01, A02, A03 and A04) through a teacher lead mind map to show Pupils the journey that they are about to embark upon that term. There is a planned creative learning programme for each term, and each year group that ensures that all strands of learning are taught and can be assessed. Each unit and lesson begins with a discussion of prior knowledge and previous lesson recaps and homework is set to enhance Pupils understanding of key skills and artists.

Art and Design is an exciting and demanding subject that develops Pupils’ practical skills and uses creativity along with personal ideas to produce a range of outcomes. Pupils can express themselves using a range of different materials when looking at a variety of different themes and artists. The art curriculum provides opportunities to work with two-dimensional media, such as drawing, painting, mixed media and printmaking. Pupils will also have the opportunity to work with 3D materials and create a range of sculptures. The curriculum is personalised to meet individual skills and interests and allows all Pupils to achieve their potential.

Drawing plays a fundamental part in the development of all art work in the curriculum, however, Pupils will also experience a variety of different artistic activities such as painting, ceramics, printmaking, three-dimensional work, collage, mixed media, textiles, photography, ICT and sketchbook work.

The art curriculum involves Pupils exploring the applications of both new technologies and historical and contemporary art practice within their work. All Pupils are encouraged to develop their knowledge and understanding of how to:

  • develop ideas through looking at artists’ work
  • explore art media, materials and processes to express and create original ideas
  • record their experiences and observations using a variety of methods
  • acquire a command of specialist artistic vocabulary and an insight into the value and significance of art in society